Buckscoop > Deals > Computers & Electronics > FUJI-XEROX 203A Laser Printer for only $88.90 delivered @ Dick Smiths!

FUJI-XEROX 203A Laser Printer for only $88.90 delivered @ Dick Smiths!

Posted By: jayne, posted 2007/07/15 11:08
Here is a bargain price for a basic black (and white!) laser printer. I couldn't live without my laser printer, even though you get hit with the cost of refills and toners, it does work out cheaper in the long run.

The price comes to $88.90 when you select "Australia Standard - Road" as the shipping method, from Dick Smith Electronics.

Details: Fast 20ppm laser monochrome printing - First page out time less than 10 seconds - 2400 x 600 dpi print resolution - 8MB memory - Versatile and high capacity media handling - Manual 2-sided printing
34°-+
$88.90Get deal
  • jayne2007/07/16 02:10:26
    The last time this deal was on at Dick Smith's, it was $99 inc del, and at that time, sandgroper dug up and calculated some very useful information, if you'd like to [COLOR=Blue]read it in this thread[/COLOR] (about running costs etc).
  • admin2007/07/16 08:27:41
    the average price on this is still in the range of 119 - 130, so it is a good price.

    Toner cartridges can be got for $59. And the link Jayne's posted tells you exactly how many pages you should get for your buck :)
  • twingurl882007/07/16 13:10:59
    admin
    the average price on this is still in the range of 119 - 130, so it is a good price.

    Toner cartridges can be got for $59. And the link Jayne's posted tells you exactly how many pages you should get for your buck :)


    where to get the toner for $59 admin?
  • admin2007/07/16 17:36:22
    Computer World have what look to be the genuine CRU Toner @ $59 for the 2.5k yield and 12k yield for 86.20 @ better IT
  • twingurl882007/07/16 18:12:03
    wats the difference between 2.5k yield and 12k yield and wat does it mean admin?
  • admin2007/07/16 18:55:18
    2500 pages vs 12000 twingurl. The 12000 is sold as a 'drum' for the 203A. I dont get why there is such a price discrepancy. You'd think for something that delivers 4x the capacity you'd be paying proportionally more. Maybe one of the printer guru's can answer this.
  • sandgroper2007/07/16 20:38:58
    The drum is seperate from Toner, you need both eventually. The drum usually lasts 20k pages, but I see Admin has a quote of 12k for this model
    Toner is the bit you replace after around 2.5k pages depending on amount of ink per page and if saver mode is used.
    Obviously when it gets to need a drum you ebay it and buy a new printer :D
  • admin2007/07/16 20:46:19
    ahhhhh - ok - I was under the mistaken impression that you could get by with just toner.

    So basically you buy it new with drum and toner in it. Replace your toner somewhere between 4 and 8 times. And by then your drum has pretty much run out.... then bang it on ebay and buy another one :D - smart really.
  • sandgroper2007/07/16 20:51:38
    How Laser printers work

    The Basics: Static Electricity
    The primary principle at work in a laser printer is static electricity, the same energy that makes clothes in the dryer stick together or a lightning bolt travel from a thundercloud to the ground. Static electricity is simply an electrical charge built up on an insulated object, such as a balloon or your body. Since oppositely charged atoms are attracted to each other, objects with opposite static electricity fields cling together.

    A laser printer uses this phenomenon as a sort of "temporary glue." The core component of this system is the photoreceptor, typically a revolving drum or cylinder. This drum assembly is made out of highly photoconductive material that is discharged by light photons

    http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/laser-printer-path.gif

    The Basics: Drum
    Initially, the drum is given a total positive charge by the charge corona wire, a wire with an electrical current running through it. (Some printers use a charged roller instead of a corona wire, but the principle is the same.) As the drum revolves, the printer shines a tiny laser beam across the surface to discharge certain points. In this way, the laser "draws" the letters and images to be printed as a pattern of electrical charges -- an electrostatic image. The system can also work with the charges reversed -- that is, a positive electrostatic image on a negative background.

    After the pattern is set, the printer coats the drum with positively charged toner -- a fine, black powder. Since it has a positive charge, the toner clings to the negative discharged areas of the drum, but not to the positively charged "background." This is something like writing on a soda can with glue and then rolling it over some flour: The flour only sticks to the glue-coated part of the can, so you end up with a message written in powder.

    With the powder pattern affixed, the drum rolls over a sheet of paper, which is moving along a belt below. Before the paper rolls under the drum, it is given a negative charge by the transfer corona wire (charged roller). This charge is stronger than the negative charge of the electrostatic image, so the paper can pull the toner powder away. Since it is moving at the same speed as the drum, the paper picks up the image pattern exactly. To keep the paper from clinging to the drum, it is discharged by the detac corona wire immediately after picking up the toner.

    The Basics: Fuser
    Finally, the printer passes the paper through the fuser, a pair of heated rollers. As the paper passes through these rollers, the loose toner powder melts, fusing with the fibers in the paper. The fuser rolls the paper to the output tray, and you have your finished page. The fuser also heats up the paper itself, of course, which is why pages are always hot when they come out of a laser printer or photocopier.
    So what keeps the paper from burning up? Mainly, speed -- the paper passes through the rollers so quickly that it doesn't get very hot.

    http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/laser-printer-fuser.gif

    After depositing toner on the paper, the drum surface passes the discharge lamp. This bright light exposes the entire photoreceptor surface, erasing the electrical image. The drum surface then passes the charge corona wire, which reapplies the positive charge.
  • jayne2007/07/16 22:53:43
    Thanks sandgroper!!! :w00t:
  • admin2007/07/18 00:31:01
    Ha - I had no idea how one worked. An inkjet is fairly self explanatory but I'd never stopped to think about a laser printer.
  • jayne2007/07/18 09:52:44
    admin;9434
    Ha - I had no idea how one worked. An inkjet is fairly self explanatory but I'd never stopped to think about a laser printer.


    The bit I always have to stop and think about, is which way up to put the paper when I'm trying to print on special headed paper!! :confused:
  • admin2007/07/18 17:30:29
    the side facing you gets printed on doesnt it?
  • jayne2007/07/18 18:10:44
    admin;9448
    the side facing you gets printed on doesnt it?


    I think it's different with every printer!!

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