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The Cost of Owning a Pet in Australia

Posted by on June 11, 2016 at 8:40 AM

The Cost of Owning a Pet in Australia

 

Pet ownership can be one of the most rewarding experiences for people and is found to be closely be linked to healthy living, both for the mind and the body. Owning a pet is considered by many to be one of life’s great enjoyments due to the companionship and a greater sense of community and socialisation. Within a family household a pet can also be used to teach children responsibility, routine and empathy.

The Australian Veterinary Association have released figures on dog owners which shows that the average dog owner will spend roughly $25,000 per animal over its lifetime. These costs are related to food, veterinary bills, health products and accessories. This total figure, however, does not include the price that one may additionally pay to buy an animal. Unsurprisingly for some perhaps, the cost of owning a dog is actually greater than that of a cat. In both cases though, cost factors need to be carefully considered before bringing a pet into your life.

Below are some more facts about owning either a cat or a dog because these are the most popular choices for people.

 

 

The cost of owning a Dog

The Cost of Owning a Pet in AustraliaDogs have the potential to live up to 15 years old, so one must consider that the annual cost per dog could be multiplied by as many as 15 times. The average minimum cost that an owner would be looking at is roughly $910 per year to own a dog. The total figures at the end of a dogs life may vary depending on the breed, age, size and any illnesses or accidents that the animal experiences in its life.

 

Upfront Dog Costs

Below are some of the upfront costs that a new dog owner may encounter when choosing a new best friend.

  • Buying a dog: $0 – $25,000
  • Desexing: $200 – $500
  • Council registration: $40 – $150 (desexed / undesexed)
  • Micro chipping; $60 – $80
  • Puppy vaccinations: $170 – $250
  • Flea & worm preventative action: $120 – $200
  • Kennel or bed: $100 – $250
  • Car restraint: starting at $30 upwards
  • Collar, leash or harness: $40 – $100
  • Food bowls: up to $400
  • Grooming: $70 – $90 upwards
  • Puppy training: starting at $170
  • Toys and treats: $50 upwards

 

The total first year costs can range anywhere form $2,350 – $5,220 depending on the quality of products that you buy for your furry friend. The costs above are purely a rough guide to help assist you with your decision to buy a dog. The actual prices can depend on the places that you shop, the territories that you live in and the brands that you buy. If you adopt a dog from the RSPCA then you can save money because the micro chipping, desexing, initial vaccinations and worm and flea treatment have already been completed.

The continued costs that one might incur when owning a dog are as follows:

  • Toys and treats: $30 per month
  • Grooming: $70 – $90 depending on breed, size and frequency
  • Flea and worm treatments: $120 per time
  • Food: $400 per year
  • Annual health check: $90

 

The minimum total cost per year will be roughly $910.

 

 

 

The cost of owning a Cat

The Cost of Owning a Pet in AustraliaCats can actually surpass dogs in the amount of years that they live, with some breeds living up to 20 years old. Therefore, in addition to the first year’s costs, you could potentially multiply the cost per year for your cat by 20 times. The RSPCA suggests that the average cost per cat could be as little as $880 per year. However, the final figure will depend on the breed, size, age and any illnesses or accidents that the cat experiences during its life.

 

Upfront Cat Costs

Below are some of the upfront costs that a new cat owner may encounter when choosing to bring on into their life.

  • Buying a dog: $0 – $5,000
  • Desexing: $115 – $300
  • Council registration: $40 – $150 (desexed / undesexed)
  • Micro chipping; $60
  • Kitten vaccinations: $170 – $200
  • Flea & worm preventative action: $100
  • Carry Cage and bed: $50 – $150
  • Collar or bell: $15 – $50
  • Food bowls: up to $300 upwards
  • Grooming: $50 upwards
  • Scratch post: starting at $20
  • Toys and treats: $30 upwards
  • Tray and litter: $100 upwards

 

The total first year cost of having a cat can be anywhere from $1,150 – $3,570 based on the calculations made by the RSPCA. However, if you choose to adopt a cat from the RSPCA rather than buying one then you can avoid the costs of micro chipping, desexing, initial vaccinations and worm and flea treatment, much like if you adopt a dog from them

The on-going costs that you may incur with your cat could be as follows, but will of course depend on the breed, size etc.:

  • Toys and treats: $30 per month
  • Grooming: $50 upwards depending on breed, size and frequency
  • Flea and worm treatments: $75 – $100 per time
  • Food: $500 per year
  • Annual health check: from $50
  • Litter: $75 upwards

 


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